Do not ask what your country

Kennedy Papers, John F. But we shall always hope to find them strongly supporting their own freedom — and to remember that, in the past, those who foolishly sought power by riding the back of the tiger ended up inside. The young men of America have risen to those occasions, giving themselves freely to the rigors and hardships of warfare.

Speech at Civic Auditorium, Seattle, Washington 6 September We are a great and strong country — perhaps the greatest and strongest in the history of the world. We face in the Soviet Union a powerful and implacable adversary determined to show the world that only the Communist system possesses the vigor and determination necessary to satisfy awakening aspirations for progress and the elimination of poverty and want.

We, the people, are the boss, and we will get the kind of political leadership, be it good or bad, that we demand and deserve.

“Ask not what your country can do for you; ask what you can do for your country.”

I believe in a President whose religious views are his own private affair, neither imposed by him upon the nation or imposed by the nation upon him as a condition to holding that office. I do not shrink from this responsibility — I welcome it.

Let both sides explore what problems unite us instead of belabouring those problems which divide us. Then we shall not be weary.

While the so-called religious issue is necessarily and properly the chief topic here tonight, I want to emphasize from the outset that we have far more critical issues to face in the election; the spread of Communist influence, until it now festers 90 miles off the coast of Florida — the humiliating treatment of our President and Vice President by those who no longer respect our power — the hungry children I saw in West Virginia, the old people who cannot pay their doctor bills, the families forced to give up their farms — an America with too many slums, with too few schools, and too late to the moon and outer space.

But we cannot have such a world, and we cannot have such a peace, unless the United States has the vitality and the inspiration and Do not ask what your country strength. But there is no comfort or security for us in evasion, no solution in abdication, no relief in irresponsibility.

Let us not seek to fix the blame for the past — let us accept our own responsibility for the future. It took toil and courage and determination to build this country — and it will take those same qualities if we are to maintain it. These are the real issues which should decide this campaign.

I want a Chief Executive whose public acts are responsible to all groups and obligated to none — who can attend any ceremony, service or dinner his office may appropriately require of him — and whose fulfillment of his Presidential oath is not limited or conditioned by any religious oath, ritual or obligation.

To those old allies whose cultural and spiritual origins we share, we pledge the loyalty of faithful friends. But we shall always hope to find them strongly supporting their own freedom - and to remember that, in the past, those who foolishly sought power by riding the back of the tiger ended up inside.

We live under majority rule and if that majority is not well educated in its responsibilities, the whole Nation suffers. And the reason it failed was because the Communists are determined to destroy us, and regardless of what hand of friendship we may hold out or what arguments we may put up, the only thing that will make that decisive difference is the strength of the United States.

Kennedy His Inauguration and expanded from 42 to 77 lines, to Kennedy in March The graves of young Americans who answered the call to service surround the globe.

While Kennedy was charismatic and seemed at ease, Nixon appeared shifty and blended into the background because of his grey suit. The courage of life is often a less dramatic spectacle than the courage of a final moment ; but it is no less a magnificent mixture of triumph and tragedy.

And it represents the kind of Presidency in which I believe — a great office that must neither be humbled by making it the instrument of any one religious group nor tarnished by arbitrarily withholding its occupancy from the members of any one religious group. History tells us that Kennedy won the debate, but some studies have found that those who heard the debate on the radio actually preferred Nixon.

For man holds in his mortal hands the power to abolish all forms of human poverty and all forms of human life. My call is to the young in heart, regardless of age — to all who respond to the Scriptural call: But this peaceful revolution of hope cannot become the prey of hostile powers.

Don't Ask What You Can Do for Your Country

Together let us explore the stars, conquer the deserts, eradicate disease, tap the ocean depths, and encourage the arts and commerce. Kennedy His Inauguration "The glory of a next Augustan age Of a power leading from its strength and pride, Of young ambition eager to be tried, Firm in our free beliefs without dismay, In any game the nations want to play.Sep 18,  · And the original quote was: Ask not what your country can do for you, but what you can do for your country.

It means that if you want something, you need to go out and work to get ultimedescente.com: Resolved. And so, my fellow Americans: ask not what your country can do for you — ask what you can do for your country.

John F. Kennedy

With a good conscience our only sure reward, with history the final judge of our deeds, let us go forth to lead the land we love, asking His blessing and His help, but knowing that here on earth God's work must truly be our own. Ask not what your country can do for you; ask what you can do for your country.

Read more quotes from John F. Kennedy. Share this quote: Like Quote. Recommend to friends. Friends Who Liked This Quote. To see what your friends thought of this quote, please sign up!

likes All Members Who Liked This Quote. His historic words, “Ask not what your country can do for you – ask what you can do for your country,” challenged every American to contribute in some way to the public good.

In this lesson, students learn about a theme in President Kennedy’s inaugural address, civic action, and consider how it applies to their own lives.

"Ask Not What Your Country Can Do For You" John F.

Kennedy's Inaugural Address, January 20, We observe today not a victory of party, but a celebration of freedom — symbolizing an end, as well as a beginning — signifying renewal, as well as change.

explain the quote, “Ask not what your country can do for you—ask what you can ask not what your country can do for you—ask what you can do for your country.” I do not shrink from this responsibility—I welcome it.” 3.

Read and/or listen to all or part the most recent inaugural address.

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Do not ask what your country
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